AWS Lambda Posts - Page 2

Orchestrating AWS Lambda Functions Using AWS Step Functions

Orchestrating AWS Lambda functions with AWS Step Functions

While our serverless applications grow day by day; the need to orchestrate our Lambda functions may become an issue. We might need to execute some functions sequentially and one of our functions might get output of another function as input. Similarly, some functions might require to be executed in parallel. In these cases, AWS Step Functions can help us to coordinate our Lambda executions as components of our distributed applications and microservices.

In this blog post, I will make an introduction to AWS Step functions with a simple case. I will try to show how we can define sequential and parallel executions, as well as intermediary states to transform one state’s output to pass another state as input. Read more at Orchestrating AWS Lambda Functions Using AWS Step Functions post.

Provisioning Custom AWS CloudFormation Resources With AWS Lambda Functions

AWS CloudFormation is the foundation of operational excellence on AWS. We code our infrastructure as JSON or YAML templates and test it as much as we need before deploying to production. We manage our infrastructure as code.

However, some new AWS resources may not be supported by AWS CloudFormation at the time they are launched. As of today, an example of this is the Elastic GPU resource. The solution is to define a custom CloudFormation resource and attach it to an AWS Lambda function which launches these resources. The Lambda function should also be in the same template. So let’s talk about how to do this in this blog post. Read more at Provisioning Custom AWS CloudFormation Resources With AWS Lambda Functions post.

Running AWS Lambda Functions in a VPC and Accessing RDS

Running AWS Lambda in VPC and Accessing RDS

AWS Lambda allows us running code without maintaining servers and paying only for the resources allocated during the code run. In most cases, we do not need to run our Lambda function in a VPC and it is recommended not to run in a VPC in these situations as a best practice. Some of examples to these are sending emails using Amazon SES or accessing a DynamoDB table.

However, to access an RDS database in your Lambda function you have to run your function in the same VPC or in a VPC that has a peering connection to the VPC of your RDS instance. In this blog post I would like to discuss about running AWS Lambda functions in a VPC and accessing a RDS MySQL database. Read more at Running AWS Lambda Functions in a VPC and Accessing RDS post.